Most Visited Place In Denmark

By | June 7, 2017

Most Visited Place In Denmark,The culture of Denmark has a rich intellectual and artistic heritage.Denmark’s many charms have become apparent to a global audience,The name of the country means “Borderlands of the Danes” in reference to a political unit created during the sixth through ninth centuries.Denmark is a small nation whose cultural unity is mitigated by regional traditions of rural, urban, and island communities with distinctions based on local language, food, and history. This situation has sometimes created friction between local history and national history.the hometown of master storyteller Hans Christian Andersen, is a must. A museum here is dedicated to the writer and a visit to his childhood home is a real treat. the bicycle takes precedence over the car and is arguably the best way to explore this compact,Denmark historically includes the former colonies Greenland and the Faroe Islands. Greenland gained home rule in 1979. In 1948, the Faroe Islands became a self-governing territory within the Danish state,Denmark is a constitutional monarchy and the oldest kingdom in Europe. the magnificent parliament buildings at Christiansborg. Similarly, Danish/Swedish collaboration Bronen (The Bridge) showed the world the Oresund Bridge, a stunning feat of engineering that links the two countries by road and rail. For lovers of literature,let’s see Most Visited Place In Denmark,

1. Tivoli Gardens, Copenhagen

Tivoli Gardens is a famous amusement park and pleasure garden in Copenhagen, Denmark. The park opened on 15 August 1843 and is the second-oldest operating amusement park in the world,after Dyrehavsbakken in nearby Klampenborg, also in Denmark.When visiting Copenhagen, many visitors make a beeline for this iconic recreation space. Dating from 1843, Tivoli is the inspiration behind the world-famous Disney theme parks, and here, you’ll find a huge range of attractions including a roller coaster, roundabouts, puppet theaters, restaurants, cafés, gardens, food pavilions, and even a Moorish-styled concert hall. Known across the world, Tivoli has appeared in numerous movies and is a true symbol of the city. At night, firework displays illuminate the sky, and in winter, the gardens are adorned with lights for the Christmas season. During the summer, you can catch free rock concerts on Friday nights.

2. Christiansborg Palace

Christiansborg Palace is a palace and government building on the islet of Slotsholmen in central Copenhagen, Denmark. It is the seat of the Danish Parliament, the Danish Prime Minister’s Office and the Supreme Court of Denmark. Also, several parts of the palace are used by the Danish monarch, including the Royal Reception Rooms, the Palace Chapel and the Royal Stables.On the tiny island of Slotsholmen in the center of Copenhagen, you’ll find the Danish seat of government. Boasting more than 800 years of history, Christiansborg is the power base of the kingdom of Denmark and now home to the Parliament, the Prime Minister’s Office, and the Supreme Court. Fans of the TV series Borgen will be familiar with the setting. Several wings are still used by the Royal household and much of this is open to the public. Bishop Absalon built fortifications of the city here in 1167, and visitors can see ruins of the bishop’s castle, which was destroyed in the 14th century, as well as the medieval fortress.

3. National Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen

The National Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen is Denmark’s largest museum of cultural history, comprising the histories of Danish and foreign cultures, alike. The museum’s main building is located a short distance from Strøget at the center of Copenhagen. It contains exhibits from around the world, from Greenland to South America. Additionally, the museum sponsors SILA – The Greenland Research Centre at the National Museum of Denmark to further archaeological and anthropological research in Greenland.A ten-minute stroll from Tivoli Gardens leads to the National Museum (Nationalmuseet), which delves into Danish history and culture. The museum displays an impressive collection of Danish artefacts, including a 2,000-year-old sun chariot, Danish porcelain and silver, and Romanesque and Gothic church trimmings. Other collections highlight clothing from the 18th and 19th centuries as well as antique furniture. Supplementing this journey back through Danish history is an excellent ethnographic exhibition with items from Greenland, Asia, and Africa among others. At the Children’s Museum, kids can dress up in period costume, climb aboard a Viking ship, and visit a 1920s-style classroom.

4. The National Gallery of Denmark

The National Gallery of Denmark,The museum’s collections constitute almost 9,000 paintings and sculptures, approximately 240,000 works of art on paper as well as more than 2,600 plaster casts of figures from ancient times, the middle-ages and the Renaissance. The major part of the museum’s older collections comes from the art chambers of Danish kings. Approximately 40,000 pieces from the collections are expected to be made available online by 2020.The National Gallery of Denmark houses the country’s largest collection of Danish art. The original exhibits were once housed at Christiansborg, but moved to the current location in the late 19th century. A gigantic extension has not only significantly extended the space, but allows natural light to flood into the interior of the museum. Covering more than 700 years of European and Scandinavian art, the museum displays paintings by the Dutch Masters, Picasso, and Edvard Munch among others. Not surprisingly, fine collections of Danish art are also on display. The café is particularly pleasant and a great place to unwind and soak up the surroundings.

5. Nyhavn, Copenhagen

Nyhavn is a 17th-century waterfront, canal and entertainment district in Copenhagen, Denmark. Stretching from Kongens Nytorv to the harbour front just south of the Royal Playhouse, it is lined by brightly coloured 17th and early 18th century townhouses and bars, cafes and restaurants. The canal harbours many historical wooden ships.The star of countless images and postcards of the city, Nyhavn (New Harbor) is a great place to stroll or grab a slice of Copenhagen café culture. Located to the rear of Amalienborg Palace, this was once a disreputable stretch of dockland but has been given a new lease of life with its multi-colored houses, restaurants, and tall ships (some of which are museums) dotting the quayside. Nyhavn is now a particularly charming quarter and consequently a major draw for tourists and locals alike. If you’re feeling adventurous, you can catch a hydrofoil to Sweden from here or grab a pleasant harbor cruise to see the sights.

 

 

 

 

5 thoughts on “Most Visited Place In Denmark

  1. Christy B

    So many great places I hope to see one day! You highlighted them well. That gallery sounds amazing.

    Reply
  2. Joanne Sisco

    I loved Copenhagen and would gladly revisit if given a chance. Christiansborg Palace would definitely be on my list.

    Reply
  3. Sally

    This wonderful tour reminded me of my trip to Copenhagen. I was there only a few days and did not see much. A beautiful city with a great history. Thank you!

    Reply

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